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iianhong_wu

Jianhong Wu

The Canadian Applied and Industrial Mathematics Society and the Fields Institute are pleased to announce that Prof. Jianhong Wu of York University has been awarded the 2019 CAIMS-Fields Industrial Mathematics Prize in recognition of their many contributions to dynamical systems in mathematical epidemiology and in particular, their collaborative research with public health professionals in government and industry: applying their expert knowledge to infectious disease mitigation strategies and preparedness.

 

It is a great honour for the Canadian Applied and Industrial Mathematical Society to present the 2003 Research Prize to Prof. Jianhong Wu from York University.  With four major monographs and over 140 published articles, Dr. Jianhong Wu has made very significant contributions in the area of infinite dimensional differential equations with applications to neural networks and population dynamics. He has been recognized as an outstanding researcher and an excellent leader not only in this area but also in applied mathematics. His book published by Springer-Verlag in 1996 has been a classical reference and a masterpiece in the area of parital functional differential equations and his joint book with Tibor Krisztin and Hans-Otto Walther, published by the American Mathematical Society as a special volume of the Fields Institute Monograph series, is regarded as a major breakthrough in the decription of the global attractor defined by semiflows generated by delay differential sytems with monotone feedback. His work on equivalent degree and global Hopf bifurcation theory and the joint book with W. Krawcewicz published by John Wiley as a special volume of the Canadian Mathematical Society monograph series provide powerful analytic and topologial tools to describe spatial-temporal patterns in physical systems. His recent work, partially represented by a monograph published by de-Gruyter, on neural networks, touches on the heart of the mathematical theory of cognitive science with applications to associative memory, pattern recognition and data analysis. Based on the excellency of his research, he has been awarded a Canada Research Chair (Tier I) in Applied Mathematics, the Alexander von Humboldt Fellowship and the Paul Erdős Fellowship.

Laboratory for Industrial and Applied Mathematics
Centre for Disease Modeling
Department of Mathematics and Statistics
York University
Toronto, Canada M3J 1P3

wujh@mathstat.yorku.ca

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